Sharing Adderall: 6 Questions You May Be Asking

Your friend knows you have attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and knows you have Adderall.

I have some leftover every month because I often forget to take it, but shouldn’t I save those in case of emergency? Or should I just be throwing them away?

There are so many questions that come with having any prescription. This is even more true when it comes to Adderall, a drug that is consistently sought after by many young people and professionals looking for a pick-me-up.

Let’s dive into what you are probably asking, and if you are not, you should be asking yourself.

1.) What Happens When Someone Without an Adderall Prescription Takes It?

Adderall is a stimulant. Stimulants, like other drugs, change the production, makeup, and release of chemicals in the body.

Stimulants change the alertness, activity, focus, and energy of the person taking them. While not all stimulants are legal (e.g., cocaine and methamphetamine), Adderall is when given with a prescription.

Adderall is prescribed because it has been proven effective in combating ADHD symptoms in around 80% of those who have ADHD.

A person with ADHD faces challenges every day. They battle the symptoms of ADHD that include, but are not limited to:

  • Overactivity
  • Interruptions
  • Organizational problems
  • Lack of attention
  • Inability to concentrate
  • Inability to stop moving

Adderall is one of the most commonly prescribed stimulants in the United States. It works by releasing dopamine, or the “feel-good” hormone, in the brain. This allows for increased happiness and focus.

What happens when someone without a diagnosis of ADHD or a prescription for the drug takes it?

Commonly called the “study drug”, Adderall provides those without ADHD with a lot of energy, focus, and attentiveness. Yes, this is very similar to what it does for those with ADHD.

It is not safe to take without a prescription, though.

While those who take their prescribed medication in moderation as a means of symptom relief do not often grow addicted, those who either take more than prescribed or take it without a prescription at all are at risk of developing an addiction.

Taking any drug only for its added benefits without a medical need opens the possibility of addiction and dependence.

2.) Is Adderall Dangerous for Teenagers? Adults?

Adderall is a prescription drug. When prescribed and used as directed, it is safe.

The drug has been proven effective and helpful in containing the symptoms of ADHD and in some instances narcolepsy, a condition that causes a person to fall asleep or lose consciousness without wanting to.

Unfortunately, as stated earlier, there is a chance of misuse and addiction with Adderall because of the effects it has on the person taking it. This is far more common in those who take Adderall without a prescription.

It is also far more common in teens and young professionals.

When addiction to Adderall shows up, it’s hard to hide, like many addictions. There are common signs to look for in someone who is addicted to Adderall, which may include:

  • Hyperactivity
  • Loss of appetite
  • Social withdrawal
  • Aggression
  • Mood swings
  • Sleeping long hours and inconsistent hours
  • Exhaustion
  • Secretive behavior
  • Financial problems
  • Weight loss
  • Incomplete thoughts
  • Overworking
  • Impulsive behaviors

3.) Is It Illegal to Give Someone Adderall Even If They Have ADHD?

Yes. It is illegal to give or share Adderall with anyone.

It is also illegal to take someone else’s Adderall.

Being caught with the drug without a prescription comes with a very hefty criminal penalty.

In the United States, Adderall is a Schedule II controlled substance. Possession of a Schedule II controlled substance without a prescription is punishable by up to five years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $5,000.

Having a prescription but being caught selling or giving it away is also illegal. You can be found guilty of drug trafficking — which carries different felony penalties from state to state.

Non-criminal penalties exist as well. It is not uncommon to find Adderall on college campuses. You can also be found in violation of a college’s code and expelled from school for being found guilty of sharing Adderall.

4.) I Might Have ADHD. Where Can I Get a Prescription for Adderall?

You need to first set up an appointment with your primary care physician. That needs to be step one in this process.

You may be reading this as someone who’s been taking Adderall from a friend or family member — whether that be by purchase, charity, or stealing.

It’s understandable that you haven’t gone to see a doctor. There are countless reasons, most of which surround cost, especially for those without health insurance.

We assure you, though, regardless of your situation, going to a doctor to begin a regimented schedule of taking Adderall if needed will not only save you money in the long run, but it could also save you from future dependence or addiction issues.

After speaking with a doctor, you may be advised to see a therapist or take part in additional testing to assure the diagnosis.

If you are currently taking Adderall without a prescription and can stop, please do.

5.) Can I Call For More Adderall If I Run Out?

It seems like common sense, but it’s something you can overlook. If you give away your Adderall, you won’t have it anymore.

Maybe that is an oversimplification.

There are certainly instances where you’ve given someone, maybe a child or family member, a medicine before like ibuprofen (Advil) or acetaminophen (Tylenol). When you gave it to them, in turn, you might’ve ended up needing some and not having any.

So you run to the store and just grab more.

That’s not the case with prescribed drugs like Adderall. As a controlled substance, Adderall prescriptions follow strict codes and regulations on how often it should be given out to a person.

Through multiple checks and balances, it is not simply getting a refill early.

Remember this next time you are asked to share or sell your Adderall.

6.) I Think I Have Adderall Addiction. What Should I Do?

First, realize you are not alone here. Adderall addiction is common, and there are thousands in the United States alone who are facing this as well.

Adderall is a powerful stimulant that can leave you wanting more and more until it is the only thing you can focus on.

If you or a loved one is struggling, the best thing to do for your future is call for help.

Recovery from Adderall addiction typically begins with detoxing your body of the drug, which can be referred to as “Adderall crash.” After your body has ridden a high of nonstop energy and focus from the drug, it over-corrects itself in the detox process occasionally.

This can lead to fatigue, depression, and even suicidal thoughts. It’s best to have medical supervision to relieve these symptoms during withdrawal.

After detox, treatment can truly begin.

Call Vertava Health

If Adderall addiction treatment sounds like something you could benefit from, give Vertava Heath a call today at (615) 208-2941.

We have locations throughout the country and want to help you however we can. Addiction never takes a day off, and neither do we. We’re here 24/7. Call us at (615) 208-2941.

FAQs:

Is it illegal to share Adderall?

Taking someone else’s Adderall is illegal. Being caught with the drug without a prescription comes with a very hefty criminal penalty.

In the United States, Adderall is a Schedule II controlled substance. Possession of a Schedule II controlled substance without a prescription is punishable by up to five years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $5,000.

Having a prescription but being caught selling or giving it away is also illegal. You can be found guilty of drug trafficking.

Non-criminal penalties exist as well. You can also be found in violation of a college’s code and expelled from school for being found guilty of sharing Adderall.

Why shouldn’t you take Adderall?

Adderall is meant for those with diagnosed ADHD. It is prescribed to those people for a reason.

It is a controlled substance in the United States. This alone explains the possibility of addiction. Taking Adderall without a prescription can lead to addiction and many side effects.

How does Adderall affect someone with ADD?

In people with ADD or ADHD, Adderall helps reduce impulses and increase attention and focus. It does the same for people without ADHD or ADD, but to a greater degree.

What does Adderall do to someone without ADHD?

In people without ADHD, Adderall helps reduce impulses and increase attention and focus. It does the same for people with ADHD, but to a lesser degree, as it is designed for them to normalize their impulses.

Call Vertava Health now!